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talked about that ubs story. that's a massive, massive fine. one of the biggest banks here in europe. yes, there have been a lot of press speculation about the side of the fine, but it's three times bigger than the fine ba barclay's was fined. ubs also admitting to criminal wro wrongdoing in japan. >> how are global markets doing at this hour? >> well, actually global markets are up. they're cheering, you know, the fact that there could be a fiscal cliff deal between democrats and republicans. look, we've got european markets close to year highs, the cac and dax at 52-week highs. this is more related to the expected aggressive monetary easing by the boj, but even the u.s. markets, the s&p 500 at a two-month high. >> i'm curious, we never really know how the fiscal cliff conversation plays out overseas. is it something that moves the needle in the markets in europe and asia? >> absolutely it does. given that, you know, in terms of european risk, everything pretty much done and dusted. we don't have much more european event risk until the end of the year, this is what we're focusing on. eve
collapsed, places like russia, eastern europe. and for the rest of the world growth has basically meant increases in carbon. so the idea that comes from mainstream economics that you can decouple carbon from the size of the economy is not at all born out over the last 20 years. >> it's born out of germany. if someone can do it, it can be done, right? is that the answer? >> well, they've had very little slow gdp growth. and there they are an unusual economy. they've been able to export a lot of their -- big export surplus. >> everyone want to be germany. in the future, we will all be net exporters. >> can i make what is going to sound in this context like the naive case for growth and remind us why -- >> i want you to. >> why it's actually important? so, you know, let's stipulate yes, climate change is really important and, yes, juliet is absolutely right. it's really hard to do both at the same time but we have to be really careful to sort of -- it can be easy to say, let's forget about growth. all of these other things, children playing and being happy are so important. the reality is
like to the rest of the world, particularly europe where eurozone are taking drastic budget cuts and austerity measures that make our situation look tame. chris just returned from a trip to europe's capitals, including athens, and shares his experience of the complete devastation in greece currently dealing with. jared bernstein, storm former economic adviser. we don't know what the risks are of what might happen january 1st. there's a risk it could be horrible. that's all i'm saying. tell me what you saw in athens n greece when you were just there. >> i've traveled to greece quite a bit over the last few years for political work i've done there in the past. i don't know how to express it any more clearly than it was unbelievably sad and depressing. i mean, the country is in a great depression. unemployment is about 25%. unemployment among youths is about 55%. the economy contracted by 7.2% in the last quarter. those are numbers. i'll tell what you i saw which i think is more powerful. you go through different parts of greece, the greek stores closed everywhere. you go down near
collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreement i had back in 2003 over the iraq war. france was against us going to war and we were against franc
that as a problem states are operating as individual countries. when you go to europe, you know, the size is around the same but you see each state size is a country in europe. we are operating like a country. each state if colorado wants marijuana then they goat et it. if florida wants to have guns. was i was growing up i noticed that the federal government stepped in more. the lawmakers were accountable. if you went too mar in yofar in state the federal government slapped you back a little bit. when president obama came into arizona he got a stern talking to. and he's a chief of the country and he has a finger in his face. we have to have the respect for our leaders. the best that we can do is get t the stand your ground laurie peeled. that is why we want to repeal that. >> lucia and ron and your lawyer, john phillips. thank you for coming here and telling the story. i'm very, very sorry that you are sitting here tonight telling the story that you have to tell. thank you. we'll be back. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop
economic times in europe and also the cooling of the luxury goods boom have really taken their toll. i believe consumption is expected to get better going into the beginning of the year, new year's and popping all and all of that kind of thing. still, even with that, it's not going to be enough to lift overall sales from a year earlier. and what's really interesting, chris, is that a downturn in -- it really shows that this drop in champagne shows that champagne's fortunes are very closely tied to europe's economic health and to the confidence of french consumers who account for half of champagne sales. >> all those bubbly french people. thank you so much. who knew that half of champagne sales are in france. thank you, mandy. >> thank you. >>> in the mood for a great burger to go with your champagne? food and wine is out with a list of best burgers. minetta tavern in new york city, in-in-out burger in california and michael's genuine food and zuni cafe in san francisco. there's a whole list on our website. raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economi
fact for your, chris. the region with the most modest needs for happiness was europe. germans only need about $85,000 to be happy. that want places them in the lowest on the list. the french need $114,000, the britains need 133,000. >> what about americans? >> reporter: i don't know. those are the numbers we have. but germans at the low end. dubai at the top end. i'm guessing it would depend on, you know, how much you need to live in that country and it's expensive to live in dubai and singapore. >> how much can a plate of sausage and keg of beer cost? >> reporter: they have great beer. >> yahoo! is out with its list of top obsessions for 2012. number five, honey boo-boo. the "hunger games" game in at number four fold by mega millions. political polls number two obsession and our top obsession this year, yes, it's apple and it's iphone 5. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you
sometimes in a nice way envy myself. i am the last and only dictator in europe and there are none anywhere else in the world. you came here and looked at a living dictator. where else would you see one?" imagine what it feels like to envy yourself. it would be totally inappropriate for our country to be friendly with guys who run these republics. that are psyched to be referred to as a dictator. but in the real world, we do have some relationships with these types of leaders and these types of countries. sometimes our presidents even go speedboating with these types of leaders. we do as a country, even when they are creeps, we do lead projects with them that our government sees as in our national interests. so in belarus, they gave up their nuclear weapons in the 1990s, but it was a big deal and a surprising thing when the obama administration got belarus to give up their highly enriched uranium too. their stockpile of the material was taken away and secured by the united states. the guy in kazakhstan, the guy who named a national holiday in his own honor, he agreed to give up a portion of
on the bloody battlefields in europe. and came back the most decorated and exercised something that was very important. they did it for their family certainly, but for the greater good because they loved america. they sacrificed themselves and many many perished on those fields and that is the kind of situation we are faced with now and those republicans can't seem to get it. they are so bull headedly when theed to their philosophy. we need to raise taxes to meet the crisis. and they would rather plunge down that cliff and plunge us into another economic catastrophe because the sequester is going to cancel the military contracts that we have and that means unemployment for many many years ahead. and all it takes is everybody rallying together and sacrificing a tiny bit. during what we enjoyed during the clinton jeers. lots of jobs being created. and cutti inting taxes creating has never been proved to be true. with the middle class maintaining the tax cuts, they are going to be spending money and creating jobs.
it to europe, other countries we can travel, so people in this country can travel to those countries knowing they're not going to be handicapped any more than they are by facilities. why would a republican vote against such a deal? you first and then john. >> there's a lot of pressure from the right on this. there's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step, by the way, on this tax cuts for the rich stuff. you know, bobby jindal said today, and i thought it was remarkable, we're in danger of becoming the party that defends the rich, anti-medicare, anti-social security, and there's no future in that k
we got now is the soviets dominating europe instead of the germans. we fought a war for this? >> did joe's outspokenness against world war ii make kennedy more of a hawk and jfk ending up being more of a hawk in response to his father? >> that's a great question. i don't know. i think part of what jfk does is follows his father. his father was an isolationist, but he was also in favor of huge military budgets to build up missile systems and every conceivable type of defense. first against the germans so they could never invade the united states and against the soviets. jack kennedy inherits this notion that we have to be strong and have a strong defense. >> interesting. >> yeah, absolutely. >> i could go on all day. this book looks like it's fascinating. joseph p kennedy, you talk about a rich tapestry of a biography that you got to dig into. i can't wait to dig into it. the book is called patriarch. check it out. first the white house soup of the day. we know you are asking. no holiday leftovers here. chicken noodle. i don't remember any chicken at any of the christmas parties. we'l
conquered. he liberated europe. he didn't need it. teddy roosevelt's an interesting example. he got war out of his system by charging up san juan hill as a young man. he was the ultimate war lover. nobody loved war more than teddy roosevelt. he was almost completely crazy about it, but he got it out of his system by doing it himself. and when he became president, you know, he talked about speak softly but carry a big stick, the great white fleet and he believed in power, but he was not desperate to rush into a war because he had already proved himself. >> which then leads us to what we see today and what is coming out of the wars that we're in today. obviously president obama's history, his story is not over yet. evan, you were talking about presidents driven by a high-minded ideology. what is president obama's as he tries to draw down yet goes in with these firm strikes? >> he just wants to get out. all this talk about nation building and helping afghanistan become a real country, they're not talking about that now. they just want out. they don't want to have al qaeda over there but -- >>
from africa and also from eastern europe and they do it to no real benefit to the american people because america workers might be disadvantaged because there are no protections for american workers to make sure that these newly-authorized green cards for these very educated workers, which we do need, that the pay for those folks isn't undercutting the salaries that current american workers get for those same kinds of jobs. >> so it creates as many problems as they think it solves. is there anything in this legislation that could be salvaged that you could agree with? >> well, there is a s.t.e.m. bill that we could pass. and what the democrats did today on the house floor is say, look, this is the bipartisan bill we can all agree to that doesn't play the zero-sum game, that doesn't undercut american workers when we do this. let's vote for that. i think the tea party is still driving the ship in the house republican conference. until that changes, it will be tough. but there are good folks on the republican side who are interested in trying to do a bipartisan bill. >> well, it's di
't see it as much in the united states and in europe. at red we're focused very much on women, because the majority of people now infected are women, six out of ten in subsaharan africa. so we're trying to do the goal of eliminating mother-child transition of hiv by 2015. and could that be the first of an aids-free generation after 30 years of this plague on the planet, and 30 million people have died, and 34 million still infected. >> what else is red doing today to get the point across, and also how folks can help out? >> well, it's world aids day, and instead of rhetoric and reports and all of those things, which is really important for a transparency to monitor the efficiency of what is going on, you can take action. so we have the number one dance record in the world right now with red. it's electronic dance music, dance red, save lives with the most popular dj in the world, tiesto. so go out and buy from itunes, the record. go to join red.com and buy a lot of red this holiday season. >> red ceo and activist deborah dugan. thank you so much. i do appreciate your time this saturday
plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring home to him and then just gave him a little bit of help finding his way. ♪ [ laughs ] [ applause ] i love you. i love you, too. >>> we are back with our roundtable for more on the economic vision over the next four years and how the fiscal cliff plays into it. and it's like those presidential debates, grover norquist. when you're mentioned by name, we have to give you a chance to respond. you heard senator mccaskill. but how about the hea
host of escalating tensions throughout the middle east. israel is feeling heat today from europe over its decision to expand settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. at least three countries summoned israeli ambassadors to condemn the action. in egypt new protests today against president morsi and massive protests are called for tomorrow. syria bomb rebels today. secretary clinton says that country is considering using chemical weapons. >> this is a red line for the united states. i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event of credible evidence. >> joining me now is former state department egypt officer joel reuben. good to have you here. let's start with that red line where syria is right now. it's estimated more than 40,000 people have been killed in this 20-month-old revolve against the government. these new reports suggesting the fresh activity at syrian chemical weapons depots. earlier this year the president singled out that threat posed by chemical weapons as a cause for greater u.s. involvement. now secretary clinton giving this warning. w
and votes coming up this week, secretary of state hillary clinton in europe this week has warned the assad regime and syria against resorting to chemical weapons. >> their behavior is reprehensible. their actions against their own people have been tragic. but there is no doubt that there's a line between even the horrors they have already inflicted on the syrian people and moving to what would be an internationally condemned step of utilizing their chemical weapons. >> joining me is former california congresswoman and president of the woodrow wilson center, jane harman. congresswoman, let's talk first about syria and the chemical weapon threat and all of the pressure now on the u.s. to recognize the opposition and to become more engaged. are there any options that you hear are likely to be taken? >> well, the focus is now on syria. events on the ground are changing. if these published reports are to be believed and there's some efforts to move chemical weapons i believe as hillary clinton has hinted, that will bring the entire international community into this game. that includes russia, w
. the japanese markets, european countries, countries in europe which are precarious are in bigger trouble. the whole thing is going wacky, one guy is going to be standing in the middle of the storm, not grover norquist or some republican but the president of the united states who has to weather the storm and point the finger across the aisle to someone nobody else in the world knows. speaker boehner, will you solve this problem. i think times change. >> the economically the biggest risk is the sequestration. it's not the tax cuts going into effect. and -- >> you mean the millions of dollars -- >> the cuts that will be forced through in the next two years. that's a much bigger risk to the economy. >> therefore? >> therefore, if the president lets this thing -- look, the markets have already priced this in. >> i hear the opposite. i hear that they believe that grown-ups will do the job when they have to. they don't believe they're going to let us go over theically. >> i don't think the grown-ups believe they have to do the job by january 1st. i believe they believe the grown-ups have to do
, the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time, asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago, but i think all of you recognized and many of you told me is that everybody's looking to america, because they understand if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that's broad-based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globally and we can get the virtuous cycle that i think all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what's holding us back right now ironically is a lot of stuff that's going on in this town, and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can break through the log jam, and go ahead and get things done and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know you've gotten a lot of briefings but let me describe where the situation is right now with respect to our fiscal situation, both what
to the soviet union, through europe. through his imprisonment and her traveling around the country. yet, they would try to explain to each other, they had other lovers, she was married and yet it was always that relationship, their friends would say there's really nothing like it. you can't come between it. >> the heart of this remarkable story, a passage for you and for, of course, your father and everything that he contributed over all of those years and congratulations. rave reviews from the "new york times." >> thank you. >> this is a very big deal. >> thank you so much. >> we will be right back. veteran former congressman jack brooks has died. he represented southeast texas for 42 years. he died tuesday night at the age of 89. brooks was in the dallas motorcade when john f. kennedy was assassinated in 1963 and can be seen on air force one standing behind jackie kennedy when lyndon johnson took the oath of office later that day. he was one of the last holdouts of an era when democrats dominated texas politics. brooks supported civil rights and refused to sign the segregation souther
overnight in asia, europe is following suit this morning, as fear dominates wall street. now the focus turns to the fed, and investors are hoping for some good news later today, after suffering the worst day in two years. >> credit rating agency basically said, we no longer have faith in you, the united states government, because we no longer believe your political system is capable of basic competence. the basic competence necessary to pay your bills. that republican-made, self-inflicted crisis and the resolution to it created this current man-made self-inflicted crisis that we're in right now. one we're lamely calling the fiscal cliff. the way republicans in congress and the president solved the debt ceiling crisis was to build this cliff, that we're now supposedly dangling off of. they inve' we're up against. the debt ceiling fight was a disaster, and now republicans, surprise, want to have that fight again. "the new york times" reports that one idea bouncing around the right side of the aisle is this. the republicans will extend tax cuts for the middle class, and then when they need to r
this morning as we've seen. some of that has to do more with europe than it does with washington. but what is your reasoning for why wall street hasn't displayed more of an impact from this fiscal cliff nonsense? >> thomas, what wall street hates most of all is uncertainty and it's counterintuitive, there's actually plenty of certainty now. what's going to be certain is taxes are going up. either we go off the cliff or the curb and then taxes rise for everybody and then maybe they get repealed for the middle class and others or we reach a deal and taxes go up for the wealthiest 2% and everybody else breathes a sigh of relief. there's some $2 trillion in cash sitting on the balance sheets of corporate america waiting to be put to work. the reason it hasn't been put to work is because of uncertainty. taxes are going to go up, the deficit is going to be reduced, some of that money is going to be released. just like ed schultz said, this is all very good news for the american economy. >> so basically the uncertainty is what's providing the certainty moving forward because people across the cou
. they just came out with the 2013 growth forecast for europe, an economy slightly bigger than the united states. they went from a plus 0.3% growth rate to minus 0.5%. the cbo said our underlying growth rate, all other things constant, our underlying growth rate has halved over the past decade from 4% to 2%. we're in a serious global growth compression period, and we need to pivot both in the united states and around the world to pro-growth reflationary strategies. >> jay, you reference that report, which i was looking at as well. what is the underlying growth rate, what does that mean exactly, and what can we do to bring it back up to the 4% where it was? >> essentially it means that the dynamics of the economy, the demographics, the productivity growth rate, the key things that drive economic growth are such that we have a 2% growth path in front of us in part because when you think about the '90s -- i know that was discussed earlier in the show -- we had a much bet demographic, kind the baby boomer bulge coming through. that boosted our potential growth rate. here we're on the other si
-- if you can't force workers to join them, outlawed a whole range of tools that workers in europe and other places use to organize, right. there are two sides of the act and all these pieces of legislation. >> i don't know. if i think if your argument is good enough your union is strong and make a better deal for your workers you're going to join people to join. >> it's always better to free ride. >> we've also expanded the ability of businesses, of corporations to inva against having union organizing. >> and intimidate. >> dessertify unions and intimidate people. what capital wants is the cheapest possible work it can buy. >> look at walmart. a great case. walmart does not pay its workers a living wage, not the minimum, $25,000 a year for going by federal poverty measurements and if they did they would lift hundreds of workers -- >> retail wages used to support a lifestyle. >> you can understand where governor snyder is coming from. sees businesses locating in indiana because of this. >> michigan has a amazing job creation and business relocation record in the last ten years. >> if you jus
part of the global conflict. the war was raging in europe examine asia for many years. the united states had kept out of it, and the american people could forecast the future where they were remaining out of this conflict. after what happens in a few short hours in the territory of hawaii on december 7, 1941 the united states of america, with a resolve that we have not really seen since except during september 11th joined the idea and accepted the idea that we were going to become a significant part of the global conflict, and we did. >> martin, you mentioned september 11th. any historical event you can't really understand what it was like to have lived at that moment unless you actually lived at that moment. do you think that 9/11 in a way provides a sort of touchstone for younger americans for what that felt like, what that pearl harbor attack would have feltd like to receive the news on? >> i think september 11th provides the closest parallel. it provides an opportunity for people who weren't aalive 71 years ago or interested in world war ii history, it provides them the opport
for a recession maybe by march, maybe by april. we also have very powerful headwinds coming from europe that is in recession because it bought into austerity economics and that's what we would be buying into in a very big way if nothing changed. we also have china that is slowing down. globally and also domestically there is not enough demand to keep the economy going and i would say the worst scenario of all -- i don't think it's going to happen, but probably by march we're going to see some real problems in the economy if nothing happens. >> i think you and i agree if we do go off the cliff, so to speak, on january 1st, that the negotiations to fix this problem would begin somewhere around january 2nd? >> probably the 8:00 a.m. the morning of january 2nd. they are going on right now. >> yes. >> there is probably a slightly better than 50/50 chance that there will be a deal before december 18th. assuming that we're close to a deal, i think it's going to happen right away and the democrats are going to be preparing legislation and it's going to be introduced right away, january 2nd, to
economy and suggests asia in general will have more overall power than the u.s. and europe combined. but before we freak out and preemptively launch economic warfare to stay on top, our next guest says america stands to gain a lot from china's growth and china's leadership may be open to the type of reforms to strengthen our relationship. we have donald gross, he's author of "the china fallacy, how the u.s. can benefit of chi in's rise and avoid another cold war." donald, welcome. i have to say i've talked to both folks on both sides of this argument. i had a long conversation with governor jon huntsman who talked about china being very healthy and robust and our relationship very important, one of the most important in the world, in fact. i talked to gordon chang a number of time who is talked about china being well, pretty evil and collapsing and wanting tock an eminent threat to our country. who's right? >> well, i have to say that i strongly agree with governor huntsman. he was after all the ambassador to china. >> right. >> he's a leading american politician. i think that he ha
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epidemic. >> i have to say, julian, i'm relieved you mentioned europe. if i had done that i would be told to go back to britain. i was born in a country and lived for over 30 years in a country where there are very strict laws and as a consequence firearms are not used to resolve domestic disputes, arguments between partners, and so on. whereas having lived here for the last almost nine years, i have become -- it's almost commonplace this kind of event. >> in the uk i think the deaths in the last year or so were 60 gun-related homicides in the entire year. in a country that has very, very strong gun control legislation. compare that to 30 a day, 200 a week, 11,000 a year. i mean, the data is just overwhelming in this case. >> and yet, joan, notwithstanding what julian has just said, in places like michigan the legislature has actually promoted bills which allow people to carry concealed weapons into church, onto school premises, into colleges. >> right. >> notwithstanding the evidence. >> notwithstanding the evidence, and they did that right after the clackamas shooting which also use ass
. in other words, north america would turn into another europe, if you will. to understand that that's what the stakes were and to see this man who, as you say, led a party that had never governed before, who had no military experience, and yet had to create an army of a million men out of raw volunteers, to see him make that work and fight his way through it i think really brings to life this transition to greatness that lincoln was able to make. >> and you write in here, you know, it's not as if he didn't know the situation he was in. and you write in here about how lincoln was aware more than anyone of this, and he always liked to refer at the time to somebody that was popular, tight rope walker jean-francois grabolet, who had performed stunts over nigagara falls, pushing a wheel barrow, cooking an omelet and all these sorts of things. he knew he was sort of on this tight rope that one wrong move and it all goes wrong. >> you can see over and over again during this year, 1862, how lincoln literally was one false step away from disaster. many people know about his ongoing battle that year
actually make an equal comparison from us, to the countries of europe and around the world, we're actually at about 120% debt to gdp right now. and of course, that's internal/external, but the extre external debt, we're over 100 now. so we're in much better shape than when we talk about the problems that we have. so i'm willing to do it incrementally, willing to do it all as a big time. what i'm willing to do is solve the problem for the future of our country. so if we do that, and the more we do of it, the more we'll see economic growth start coming. i think we're primed for economic growth, but we have to solve these very real issues to be able to take advantage of the prime. >> i agree with you. i think the economy can take off and washington can get out of the way at this point. tom coburn, republican senator from oklahoma, thank you very much for being here. >> ezra, good to be with you. god bless you. >>> there is one way we can start to fix our dysfunctional congress, and guess what, they are actually thinking about doing it. which, of course, means now other congressmen are thinkin
on the macro because the macro is moving stocks and moving the market. things like europe, the european debt crisis, things like our fiscal cliff crisis, a slowdown in china. this is how stocks are moving right now. it's no longer how many cannes of coke did we sell last quarter. it's really tied to this so it matters more than before. they're panicking and starteding to see it. look no further than the consumer confidence number dropping, the retail sales. ge has blamed some poorer results this past quarter on lack of investment. you know, honeywell is seeing the pain. they're not filling empty positions. it's already -- it has been starting to affect companies for probably, you know, at least the past quarter already. >> okay. thank you, joy, and thank you leigh. remember, president obama is going to make a statement on the fiscal cliff talks at 5:45 eastern time and msnbc will provide live coverage. until then, chris matthews is up next with the best "sideshow" moments of the year and the nra's best excuses for standing in the way of any and all reasonable restrictions on guns. this is "h
, europe, and then he is going to come to north america, follow-up to south america. we expect santa based on our experience of tracking him and obviously we don't control where he goes, but we just know that he likes to stop between country 9:00 and midnight at every home -- >> that's the best time. all the kids need to be in bed before 9:00 p.m. tonight, so parents mark your clocks. major general, thank you for taking time out for us. we appreciate it. >> all right, thomas. my pleasure. merry christmas to you and your team there. >> thank you so much. back at you. that's going to wrap things up for me this hour. thanks so much. in the next hour i'm going to have a chance to speak with democratic congresswoman karen bass. is she hopeful that a fiscal cliff deal will be struck before the new year? (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana sea
it was possible to just keep giving in to him, so that he would not carry out his plans to conquer europe. that's where the word "appeaseme "appeasement" really was the strongest and is really the indictment about how the western powers behave. >> first of all, what year did you flee check slozechoslovakic? >> in march of '39. >> and how old were you? >> i was 2. >> and my father was a member of the check slovak diplomatic service. and he was out of belgrade when i was born. >> did your father know mika's uncle, grand uncle, i guess who was president of czechoslovakia? >> definitely. he worked for them, and he felt very strongly -- czechoslovakia was a very interesting place in the interwar period. it was the only functioning democracy. it was created in a large part because of woodrow wilson's policies is and the constitution was modeled on the american one, except one big thing, it had an equal rights amendment in it, even then. and basically, there was a desire by people like my father, who was in his early 30s, to try to make sure that czechoslovakia stayed democratic. so he then left, he w
important if you live in europe as i do. actually, the idea of taking 50 million people out of poverty over the next ten years if that's possible, wow, after the stuff we have done on aides as malaria. that's the reason to get out of bed, mr. president. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. c'mon, michael! get in the game! [ male announcer ] don't have the hops for hoops with your buddies? lost your appetite for romance? and your mood is on its way down. you might not just be getting older. you might have a treatable condition called low testosterone or low t. millions of men, forty-five or older, may have low t. so talk to your doctor about low t. hey, michael! [ male announcer ] and step out of
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